Jump to content

  • Please log in to reply

SheltonMax
my code
Started March 19, 2012 - 01:08 PM

SheltonMax

    Contributing Member

  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts

How to use brackets

What is the purpose of using brackets in research writing? How are they different than the use of parenthesis?

#2 patw1985 Replied March 20, 2012 - 01:13 PM

patw1985

    Contributing Member

  • PipPipPip
  • 39 posts
Writers often use brackets to augment a quote from an outside source. They use the brackets to insert extra syllables or letters to make the tense of the quote consistent with their writing. For example, I could quote an interviewee who is speaking in the present tense but write what they say in the past tense. In this case, a sentence may look like "we play[ed] great," in which I change "play" to the past tense. Also, if you begin a sentence with a quote that does not begin at the start of a sentence, you use brackets to capitalize that first letter of the first word. For example, I could write "[S]he did not believe in what she was told;" the bracketed "s" shows that the quote I used does not appear at the beginning of a sentence.

#3 wbtreece Replied March 21, 2012 - 11:33 AM

wbtreece

    Contributing Member

  • PipPipPip
  • 48 posts
Pat has the brackets right. As to the second part of your question, they differ from parentheses in that parentheses are used in some formal styles to set aside thoughts, notes, references, and page numbers in a way that distinguishes them from the main text. Sometimes, as in Turabian style, parentheses are used within footnotes to set apart publishing information.

Parentheses are not used within quotes unless the original quote uses them.

#4 carlbolton64 Replied November 28, 2012 - 01:03 AM

carlbolton64

    Grammar Newbie

  • Pip
  • 9 posts

You may have seen the expression used in a quote and wondered what it was all about. You can use this expression if you are quoting a piece of text that contains a typo, simply to make it clear that the typo was in the original and not your own mistake. For instance:
  • I agree with her assertion that "kids should read a book a weak [sic]," but I think play time is important, too.

You may also use brackets to make an editorial statement or clarification within a quote. As in:
  • My grandmother always said "dream about a [friendly] dog and you'll see an old friend soon."
  • "The reporter was unsuccessful in his attempt to get a statement from [former] Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld."


#5 carlbolton64 Replied November 28, 2012 - 01:03 AM

carlbolton64

    Grammar Newbie

  • Pip
  • 9 posts

You may have seen the expression used in a quote and wondered what it was all about. You can use this expression if you are quoting a piece of text that contains a typo, simply to make it clear that the typo was in the original and not your own mistake. For instance:
  • I agree with her assertion that "kids should read a book a weak [sic]," but I think play time is important, too.

You may also use brackets to make an editorial statement or clarification within a quote. As in:
  • My grandmother always said "dream about a [friendly] dog and you'll see an old friend soon."
  • "The reporter was unsuccessful in his attempt to get a statement from [former] Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld."



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Learn More
BECOME AN EXPERT

Call Us

877-416-3698

Office

Write.com
33 Bronze Pointe
Swansea, IL 62226
TERMS | PRIVACY | SITE MAP     © Write.com All Rights Reserved.