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Concrete vs. abstract nouns


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#1 FirstClaud

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 04:33 PM

What is the difference between a concrete and an abstract noun? Can someone give me the definition of each and provide an example for clarification?

#2 Jess

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Posted 01 March 2012 - 07:04 PM

A concrete noun is something that can be physically sensed. For example, "arm" is a concrete noun because you can touch it. On the other hand, an abstract noun is something that can be defined, but not sensed. It's more of an idea. For example, "hope" is an abstract noun because you can talk about how much hope someone has, but there's no way to touch or see it. It's an idea. Here are some more examples:

Her embarrassment was obvious when she dropped her books in front of the class.

In this case, "embarrassment" is a noun. You can't see or touch embarrassment, so that makes it an abstract noun.

The cat jumped onto the bookshelf.

In this case, "cat" is a noun. You can touch and see a cat, so that makes it a concrete noun.

#3 miss.lizabeth

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Posted 03 March 2012 - 09:38 AM

An abstract noun is one that you cannot see, hear, smell, taste, or touch. It is an emotion, ideal, or idea.

Examples of abstract nouns: sympathy, empathy, conceit, arrogance, pride, joy, happiness, sadness, sorrow, peace, anger, rage, hate, love, adoration, infatuation, desire, longing, misery, pain, brilliance, ingenuity, beauty, perfection, skill, talent, deceit, courage, timidity, fear, success, failure, compassion, integrity, honesty, loyalty, bravery, innocence, purity, dedication, feelings, emotions, admiration, laziness, attentiveness, responsibility, motivation, inspiration, luck, holiness, faithfulness, security, stupidity, curiosity, creativity, trust, belief, dream, justice, truth, faith, liberty, knowledge, thought, information, culture, progress, friendship, trouble, grace, mercy, hope, goodness, kindness, gentleness, and childhood.

Nouns with the following suffixes are often abstract:
-tion
-ism
-ity
-ment
-ness
-age
-ance/-ence
-ship
-ability
-acy

#4 Mr. Miyagi

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Posted 26 July 2012 - 01:15 PM

Concrete Nouns
A concrete noun is the name of anything or anyone that we can perceive with our 5 physical senses, touch, see, taste, hear and smell. Its opposite is abstract noun.
For example: The teacher read the story to the students.
Abstract Nouns
An abstract noun is the name of anything which we cannot perceive through our 5 physical senses just the opposite of a concrete noun.
For example: The young girl jumped with joy on receiving her gift while her friends looked on with envy.
http://learnenglish.byexamples.com/concrete-nouns-vs-abstract-nouns/

#5 Guest_jorsa pasos_*

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 06:14 PM

An abstract noun is one that you cannot see, hear, smell, taste, or touch. It is an emotion, ideal, or idea.

Examples of abstract nouns: sympathy, empathy, conceit, arrogance, pride, joy, happiness, sadness, sorrow, peace, anger, rage, hate, love, adoration, infatuation, desire, longing, misery, pain, brilliance, ingenuity, beauty, perfection, skill, talent, deceit, courage, timidity, fear, success, failure, compassion, integrity, honesty, loyalty, bravery, innocence, purity, dedication, feelings, emotions, admiration, laziness, attentiveness, responsibility, motivation, inspiration, luck, holiness, faithfulness, security, stupidity, curiosity, creativity, trust, belief, dream, justice, truth, faith, liberty, knowledge, thought, information, culture, progress, friendship, trouble, grace, mercy, hope, goodness, kindness, gentleness, and childhood.

Nouns with the following suffixes are often abstract:
-tion
-ism
-ity
-ment
-ness
-age
-ance/-ence
-ship
-ability
-acy






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